What a Portland Rose!

It has been a very busy end of 2017 and beginning of 2018. With a grand influx of custom quilting requests, my Innova longarm has been quite busy. That’s a great thing. Even better, today, I get to share with you all a magnificent flannel with wool applique quilt that found its way to my “factory”, delivered to me by its maker, the incredibly talented and wonderfully kind Joyce Hite. Joyce hand-blanket stitched the appliqué beautifully. I’m so fortunate to say that this is the third quilt I have custom quilted for her over this past 8 months and I have been incredibly blessed with all of these opportunities.

This quilt pattern, Portland Rose, was once quilted by the incredibly talented Linda Hrcka of The Quilted Pineapple, and took first in its class at Paducah in 2014. I took design inspiration from Linda for a number of areas.   I was tasked with reducing the 100 hours it took her to quilt this (by removing a lot of the fill-work and detail Linda quilted her show stopper with) and still give it a nicely detailed custom finish.

This is the first quilt on frame for me that was flannel both front and back with wool applique and since I had done some prior investigation and reading, I knew to increase the stitch length, as flannel quilts (especially ones with wool batting, such as this one) really tend to sink the stitches. I drafted out a few design options and Joyce picked one.

Joyce and I agreed that this would be the perfect quilt to play a little with the new Intelliquilter computer on my longarm and after I experimented a bit, I recorded three motifs onto practice muslin that I then digitally re-drafted and saved. Intelliquilter (IQ) is great for this, as any pattern can be rotated, trimmed, joined or scaled differently. I was all set on the digital side of things with custom digital motifs! Off we went to mark up the quilt and load it.IMG_3613

I first placed the digital motifs onto the quilt (the center medallion seen above, along with the border corners and body edge heart motifs), followed by the big freemotion quilted feathers and then the ruler work. All that was left was the freemotion fill…which took up the bulk of the quilting time. Detailed fills do take time and the fill I used on this quilt really did go rather quickly, all things considered.  I must pay my respect to Judi Madsen, who quilts with this type of fill.  After 622,000 stitches and 42 hours, we were done with this 105″ x 105″ quilt.

The most amazing thing happens after completion. After spending 40+ hours staring at this quilt in 26” sections, I get to unfurl it from the leaders and remove it from the quilt frame. Only then can I truly step back from it, take it all in, and feel the excitement that my design work and quilting actually came together to add such a gorgeous layer to the quilt. Its excitement (that I am seeing the full quilt), sadness (that the process is over) and relief (that the quilt made it through the process without incident). My clients put so much time, money and skill into producing their magnificent tops and it’s really a scary honor to longarm them.IMG_3602

Here it is in more detail…enjoy!

IMG_3615

IMG_3606

IMG_3608

IMG_3612

IMG_3609

IMG_3607

IMG_3610

Thank you so very much for spending part of your day here with me. Should you wish to have any digital edge to edge or freemotion or digital custom quilting done on one of your tops, you can reach out to me through email at: threadworksfactory@outlook.com. Reserve your slot in my schedule for 2018. If you have any questions, please just let me know. You can review my pricing by going to the pricing tab on this website.

Have a wonderful day and I hope you have a little time to be creative.

Christmas in June?

Seems a little off to me, but maybe that’s just me.  I guess, when your customer owns this Christmas quilting website (Quilted Christmas), your mind is never far from the 25th of December.  And, so goes this next quilt.  This was a digital panel that my customer brought to me, hoping that I could make this panel look like a quilt in time for the launch of this new Moda pattern.

She requested a double layer of batting and a quilting job that would render this as much of a pieced quilt look as possible.  So, we brought out two layers of batting:  Quilters Dream Blend for the base and Quilters Dream Wool for the top layer.

My customer has many years in the quilting business and knew exactly how she’d like this quilted, so I took her inputs and worked them up in my style of longarming.  As you learn longarming, you’ll learn that you have your own unique style, much  like your own handwriting, and while you can vary the look of things, they begin to take on a very identifiable trademark of sorts.  I guess I am no different and I am beginning to see that!

This digital panel from Moda, called Sugar Plum Christmas, needed a lot of stitch in the ditch in order to pop each “piece” as though it were appliqué and not remain in the “printed” look it started life as.  Ditchwork is tedious and tiring and often requires rulers.  When it’s a digital print like this one, there is no ditch to guide yourself along in, so it’s even slower and more tedious.  We plodded along…

You would think, by now, that I would remember to take a picture of the quilt top BEFORE it is quilted, but I seem to be lacking a few extra brain cells with which to record something like that.  So, let us all just skip ahead a bit and give the reveal!

Without further adieu, here is:

IMG_1670
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

This was fully free motion custom quilted, as I do not have a computer on my longarm.  Glide thread was used throughout and there were just 2 colors used–red and white.  The border spine was pre-marked with a Bohin chalk pencil and that was it.  Let’s look at the details a bit closer up:

IMG_1671
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

 

IMG_1687
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

And here are some even closer images:

IMG_1685
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

 

IMG_1675
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

I placed a freemotion holly and curl spine in the red borders and it added such a cute touch. I also echoed the stars to help pop the out a bit more.

IMG_1686
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

 

IMG_1673
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

 

IMG_1691
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

 

IMG_1676
Moda’s Sugar Plum Christmas, Quilted by Patricia Hechler at The Threadworks Factory for http://www.quiltedchristmas.com

 

Well, that does it for this installment of “What Came Off My Longarm”.  Until next time, I hope that you get the chance to be creative!

As always, if you liked this blog and would like to subscribe to it, you can do just that.  Look over on the right hand column and track up or down to the subscription area.

If you’d like to share this to facebook, pinterest or even print this out, you can click on the links below.  You can also follow me on facebook @thethreadworksfactory.

If you’d like to see some educational tutorials, I am on youtube and will be posting more as the summer starts up.  Visit my channel here.